Following the announcement made by Randox Food Diagnostics (RFD) at this year’s Randox Health Grand National, the company has welcomed a chance to further discuss the important issue of antibiot...

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Following the announcement made by Randox Food Diagnostics (RFD) at this year’s Randox Health Grand National, the company has welcomed a chance to further discuss the important issue of antibiotic use in food-producing animals. Though RUMA rightly underlines this is a complex area, those with responsibilities in this area should not shy from addressing it.

There is a clear and demonstrable link between antibiotic-residue and antibiotic-resistance, underlined by the industry guidelines on withdrawal periods to prevent antibiotic-residues entering the food market.

The use of antibiotics on farms is very much related to AMR. This is highlighted recently by the international meeting held by Global Food Standards Body – Codex Alimentarius in Nov 2016 to progress international efforts to tackle AMR.

This is further underlined by the WHO ‘’Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance’’ which refers to how resistance circulates within and between humans and animals and through food, water and the environment. It also details how ‘’much antibiotic use is linked to animal production’’. Antibiotics are being used to prevent infections to prevent the spread of diseases within a herd when infection occurs often administered through feed and water.

This easy-to-follow diagram produced by one of the major operating components of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention demonstrates how antibiotic use in food-producing animals can spread antibiotic-resistance and the consequences of this occurring.

ABR

It is a responsible approach to acknowledge the increasing levels of antibiotic-resistance bacteria found in food. A single example highlighted in the 2016 report by the Royal Veterinary College London (commissioned by the Food Standards Agency), “prevalence of multidrug resistance has increased in recent years from 19.1% in 2008 to 43.4% in 2014-2015 in Campylobacter jejuni isolates from chicken meat at retail level in the UK.”

RFD supports the standard that all food in the UK should be antibiotic-free. Through RFD’s revolutionary drug residue screening technology, food producers are being supported to ensure they meet their legal requirements. In effect, RFD is contributing to the decreasing use of antibiotics in food-producing animals not only here in the UK but globally.

Stuart Penrose, Global Marketing Manager for Randox Food Diagnostics said, “We have very strong partnerships with food producers who, just like us, are committed to ensuring global food safety. We understand change may concern some, but believe that in a short time, enhanced antibiotic-residue screening will be commonplace. We cannot do this alone, which is why we welcomed the support of The Jockey Club to allow us to carry out testing at the Randox Health Grand National to raise awareness of this very important issue. As stated by the World Health Organization, food safety is a ‘shared responsibility between governments, industry, producers, academia and consumers.’”

 

RFD Press office

Randox Food Diagnostics digital press officer

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